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About Savour Fare

Kate@SavourFare
Based in Los Angeles, Savour Fare is the home of Kate, a working mom who is low on time but high on life. I hope this site helps you find ways to make your life richer, easier, more beautiful and more delicious. You can read more about me and the site here and feel free to email me with any questions or feedback!

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Pi Day Pie Round Up

Pi Day Collage

It’s Pi Day!  That happy day when bakers and nerds collide!  Fun facts about Pi:

1) Pi is a number with an infinite, nonrepeating number of decimal places.  The first few are 3.1415926535 (which is why, incidentally, March 14, or 3.14 is known as “Pi Day” amongst a small, geeky subset of the population.  And food bloggers.)

2)  The circumference of a circle is calculated by multiplying the radius (halfway across the circle) by 2 and pi (2*pi*r).  Coincidentally, pies are circles, and 2 pie are better than one!

3) The area of a circle is calculated by multiplying the radius by itself and pie, (pi*r squared).  However, we know that in reality, pie are round.  (Except for slab pies).

OK, enough with the corny pie pi jokes.  Pi is cool, and Pie is cool.  Below are a roundup of pies we’ve made at Savour Fare.  Go bake a pie! It’s Pi Day!

 Fresh Fruit Pies

Plum Pie

Blueberry Corn Pie

Fresh Cranberry Marzipan Pie

Fresh Grape Pie

Peach Almond Slab Pie

Dried and Canned Fruit or Vegetable and Nut Pies

Maple Walnut Pie

Mince Pies

Perfect Pumpkin Pie

 Fried Dried-Apple Hand Pies

Cream Pies

Nesselrode Pie

Mini Key Lime Yogurt Pies

Spiced Cocoa Buttermilk Pie

Rice Pudding Pie

Peanut Butter Pie

Savory Pies

Chicken Cobbler Pot Pie

Chicken Kale Pizza Pie

Corn and Tomato Pie

Supper Onion Pie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy Quick Chicken Tortilla Soup and How to Add Flavor to Quick Soups

Easy Chicken Tortilla Soup txt

When it comes to dinner, I’m an obsessive planner.  With a full time job and an hour commute and two kids, my dinnertime meals are regimented.  But lunch is more spur of the moment.  Not exactly an afterthought, but definitely more of a “What do I feel like eating today?” meal.  And sometimes what I feel like eating is soup.

And when I feel like eating soup, I don’t mean soup-three-hours-from-now-after-simmering-0n-the-stovetop, but soup within the next thirty minutes or so, like this Chicken Tortilla Soup.   It comes together quickly without sacrificing flavor. Without the long simmering, I’m looking for ways to add flavor fast.  Some of my favorite ways to add quick flavor to soups are:

  1. Use good broth.  You CAN make soup from water, but if you’re looking for a fast soup, a good broth is essential.  Making your own is great, but I also like the flavors of Trader Joe’s Organic Free-Range Chicken Broth (Not reduced sodium), and Kitchen Basics Chicken Stock (Reduced Sodium OK in this case).
  2. Use add-ins that add a lot of up front flavor.  A carrot will yield its secret over time, but if you’re looking for fast, you want to add ingredients that carry a lot of flavor from the start.  This Mexican-inspired soup uses salsa and chilies to add a big punch of flavor.
  3. Toppings!  Plain soup is just that – plain.  Toppings take the soup to a whole new level, like in this cauliflower soup recipe.   This Chicken Tortilla Soup gets tortillas, cheese, avocados, cilantro – the possibilities are endless.

Continue reading Easy Quick Chicken Tortilla Soup and How to Add Flavor to Quick Soups

175* Recipes to Help You Keep Your New Year’s Resolution

Romanesco
It’s three weeks into January.  How are your new year’s resolutions going?

I’m making a concerted effort to cut down on sweet and starchy things in my diet.  I know I have a crazy sweet tooth, and I’d love to get the best of that, so there have been lots of protein and vegetables in my life.  The good news is that, after a week or so, the sweet stuff seems a little less tempting. There are some days when I think I might kill someone for a brownie, though.

Chances are, you are reaching that point where everything doesn’t seem new and fresh any more, and you’re looking for some inspiration.  Well, you’ve come to the right place! Below is a list of Savour Fare recipes that should provide some new resources and inspiration, whatever your resolution!
Continue reading 175* Recipes to Help You Keep Your New Year’s Resolution

Fresh Cranberry Pie with Marzipan and How to Make Pie Crust

Cranberry Pie Whole
You guys!  I made this pie because I was looking for a double crust pie so I could revisit my pie crust tutorial (a few things have changed in my go-to technique since the last one I posted), and most of my fruit pie fruits are not in season, but now I’m kind of obsessed.  Fresh cranberries!  In pie!  Why is this not a thing?  Cranberries might be the perfect pie fruit — they’re tart and juicy, but have a pretty high pectin content, so your pie filling doesn’t run all over the place.   The flavor is a lot like fresh sour cherry pie, but fresh sour cherries are only available one week of the year, in very small parts of the US, and cranberries can be gotten EVERYWHERE for at least two months when most pie fruits are out of commission.    And just LOOK at the color:

Cranberry Pie Slice

It’s great, is all I’m saying.

Now on to pie crust. I like to walk my readers through making pie crust, because I feel like so many people are like “Pie crust?  Who has the time for that!  It’s too hard!” and I want to pat your head and say, “No, it’s OK – you can do it.”  You don’t have to own a walk in freezer or live in the arctic to make your pie dough (though it is a bit tougher on a warm day.)  You don’t have to source special kinds of lard or NOT TOUCH IT OR IT WILL BE OVERWORKED.  Pie crust is pretty forgiving.  If it cracks? Patch it.  If you can’t roll it out in a perfect circle?  Nobody cares.  At the end of the day you will have pie, and people will love you.  This is the way I’ve been making my pie crusts, and it works pretty darn well.

Continue reading Fresh Cranberry Pie with Marzipan and How to Make Pie Crust

Fried Dried-Apple Hand Pies

Apple Pies

When I talk family traditions and family recipes on Savour Fare, I’m usually talking about my family – the family I was  born into, or the family I’ve made with Ken and Nuni and Boo.   My family is close (now that my cousin has moved back to LA from NYC, the farthest away anyone lives is about 2 hours), and we are all food people, so it’s natural to write about our places and recipes and stories.  Ken’s family is harder — for one thing, they’re geographically scattered all over the midwest, the east and west coasts, and for another, most of their traditions center around things other than food (like golf.  They play a lot of golf.)   My mother-in-law is a born and bred southerner, from the hotbed of American regional cuisine, but she’s also a wanderer, and would be perfectly happy to live on seaweed and lentils.

There has only been one major food figure in Ken’s family since I’ve known him (which is why he eats what I cook so happily), and that is Quincey.  Quincey was a substitute grandfather to Ken, whose own grandfathers both died rather young.   He was a true Southerner, who lived his whole life along the Virginia North Carolina border – he was also a musician, and a storyteller, a former tobacco farmer, a general handyman, and a damn good cook.  He taught Ken to play the mandolin, spent hours fixing up my mother-in-law’s house, and, the few times I met him, taught me a thing or two about cooking.  Collards with fatback, corn pudding, sweet potato pie, and the best fried apple pies I’ve ever tasted.  Quincey’s recipes were inexact — he measured with his fingers, adding a pinch of salt, a joint of butter.   I always meant to get them down on paper, in a form that could be reproduced, but Quincey died last year, and I never did.

Continue reading Fried Dried-Apple Hand Pies